Louisville Ballet’s Lady Lear

Hi! It’s Turtle and Moose and we went to see Lady Lear. It was a great tragedy performed by the Louisville Ballet. The only thing we were disappointed about was that this is the last play for Kentucky Shakespeare’s 57th season.

One of our favorite characters is Poor Tom because she is kind and fearless from when we first see her until the play ends. She is willing to do anything to help Lady Lear and Kentster. Another one of our favorite characters is Cornelius. He is full of heart and valor and is a model citizen of Shakespeare times. It showed in his dancing, like he is the best possible person that you would ever meet.

One of our favorite scenes is when Fanny gets killed because the fight scenes are very well choreographed. But it is sad to see the most innocent character in the play get killed. Another one of our favorite scenes is the storm because of all of the dancers that are perfectly in sync like the world revolving around the sun and the moon revolving around the Earth. The umbrellas are a nice touch and we love how it actually seems like a storm and we can feel an anger that was radiating in the hearts of the dancers, because storms seem pretty mad all of the time.

When Lear gets her family to come to her house, she asks them who loves her most. Goneril and Regan profess false love and Cornelius, not wanting to appear false, says nothing and is banished from his home. The other brothers conspire against Lear to get more land and would have succeeded if not for that lousy Poor Tom. How does she save the day? Find out in Lady Lear.

This is a great dance performance by the Louisville Ballet and we hope that you come see it. It is the final performance on the season punch card and if you have gone to every show you will get a special prize! This is also on the Cultural Pass so come see it before it’s too late!

Turtle and Moose

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CenterStage’s Kiss Me Kate

Hello from Turtle and Moose! Last night we went to see Kiss Me Kate presented by CenterStage. This is a great play presented with The Taming of the Shrew playing inside of it. What really makes it stand out are the small changes made to the plot of Taming of the Shrew.

Our first favorite characters are the gunman because they are hilarious, especially when they have to act for The Taming of the Shrew. We love the scene where they first appeared because it presents a huge problem needing to be solved while still being hilarious for the entire scene. This was the reason it is one of our favorite scenes. Our next favorite character is Paul. Paul just seems like he wants you to have a good time, he is very nice and respectful, and just looks like the friendliest friend a friend can have. In the song, “Too Darn Hot” his ballet turns are great, and he is also a great singer. “Too Darn Hot” is a great scene as the singing and dancing are great, the snapping all at the same time is amazing, and it is a great scene to immerse you back into their world after the intermission. It is a scene that just had that sort of perfection that you can’t get in that many places.

The play opens with The Taming of the Shrew starting its run soon when Bill Calhoun, a suitor of Bianca in the play, owes some shady characters money because he loses all his money because of his gambling problem. He signs an IOU with the name of Fred Graham. Right before the play starts two men working for the “shady characters” approach the real Fred Graham, the star of the Shrew. They say they need the money soon but Fred has no idea what they’re talking about. What will happen to Fred? Will Bill get away with this? Will the play be able to go on? Find out in Kiss Me Kate.

This was a fantastic play that we hope that you come to enjoy the whole way through. We must warn, however, it may storm after the “Too Darn Hot” scene. The actors did such a good job that Mother Nature thought she would make the stage a bit cooler for the wonderful performers by making it rain (and it didn’t rain money). So the performance was cancelled part way through for safety, but we are sure that the second half of this play is just as good as the first and it is still very much worth watching. Don’t forget Kentucky Shakespeare is on the Louisville Cultural Pass. This play was a work of art from CenterStage at the Jewish Community Center and we hope that you come out to Central Park to see it.

Turtle and Moose

Cincinnati Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor

Hello from Turtle And Moose! Yesterday we watched Cincinnati Shakespeare Company‘s production of The Merry Wives Of Windsor at Central Park for Shakespeare in the Park. This was a very funny play and we hope that you come and see it. The performers came all the way from Ohio to show Louisville this wonderful play.

The play opens with John Falstaff deciding to send identical love letters to Mistress Paige and Mistress Ford, both respectful married ladies. When they get the letters both are disgusted and decide to play a trick on him so he will have no choice but to leave them alone. They invite him over and after evading contact with him for a while, Masters Paige and Ford come home. The mistresses hide Falstaff in a laundry basket and have him taken to the river. He gets dumped in. They decide to play another trick the next day. While Falstaff fall for a trick again? What will happen if the Masters find about their plans? Find out in The Merry Wives of Windsor.

Our first favorite characters are Mistress Paige and Mistress Ford. We think they are extremely funny together with their intentionally fake laughs and cries for John Falstaff. They are a comedy duo that is just unforgettable. We love that they thought of these wonderful and torturous ways to mock Falstaff and it was really something to see. Another one of our favorite characters was Pistol because he is funny but he is the only character that refuses to do something too mischievous. He refuses to send the identical love letters to two already married women; it is just over the line for him. He helps John Falstaff rob someone by getting him intoxicated which was hilarious.

One of our favorite scenes is the aftermath of when Falstaff is thrown into the river. It is funny because it is a great way to connect between the pranking scenes. Also it is funny to see Falstaff throw a fish backstage and make everyone scream. Our next favorite scene is technically not a scene, but it is still gut-busting awesome fun. The performers sing at the beginning of the play and right after intermission. They sing songs about sailors, mermaids, blacksmiths, and Scotsman. They were hilarious and had they entire crowd laughing as well, we think that it really tied the entire play together and let us get to know the actors (as they come from the distant land of Ohio.)

This is an amazing play and is hilarious the whole way through. It will be in Louisville one more time on August 8th but you can go to the Cincinnati Shakespeare website to find other places they will be performing too.

Turtle And Moose

The Globe Players’ The Merchant of Venice

Hello from Turtle and Moose! Yesterday, we saw The Merchant of Venice, performed by The Globe Players and written by William Shakespeare, at the Kentucky Shakespeare Festival in Central Park. It is a very comical and enjoyable play that is a must watch for everyone. The Globe Players is a high school troupe that has been working together and learning about Shakespeare for six weeks and they have done a wonderful job with this show.

One of our favorite characters is Shylock because he is greedy and a very visibly evil character. Another one of our favorite characters is Old Gabbo; we love the gut-busting hysteria that comes after he cries. It is the perfect funniest, saddest, most awkward thing we have ever seen. We love when he always turns the wrong way when he is talking to people and it takes his son pushing his face toward the person he is speaking to for it to be a legitimate conversation.

One of our favorite scenes is when Shylock and Antonio first meet to discuss the terms of a loan. It sets up the goals and motivations for Shylock and tells us why people seem to hate him. It also provides a view of the very contrasting Antonio. Another one of our favorite scenes is when Portia and Nerissa are chewing out their husbands because they gave away their wedding rings as demanded by a judge and his clerk. It turns out that Portia and Nerissa are very involved in this test of faithfulness of their husbands. More we cannot say. (This scene could have mixed reviews, however; if Gollum were to see it, he would be unhappy with the treatment of these rings and would go back to his cave thoroughly disgusted.)

The plot of the story is that Bassanio is madly in love with the heiress Portia. In order to win her, he must participate in a contest consisting of a choice between three caskets. One will win him marriage with Portia, but choosing poorly will have negative consequences, as other suitors have already discovered. He succeeds in this trial and they become happily married. However, Bassanio lives far away from Portia and cannot pay for the journey or his expenses, so his dear friend and wealthy merchant, Antonio, agrees to help. Antonio has many active ventures and is cash-poor, so they both go to a money lender by the name of Shylock. Shylock, who strongly resents Antonio for his willingness to lend money without interest, enters into a bond that would cut off a pound of Antonio’s flesh if Antonio is not able to repay the loan. Shylock is utterly broken after a friend of Antonio’s runs off with Shylock’s daughter and the daughter runs off with a large sum of Shylock’s money. Tragedy strikes Antonio’s ventures and so Shylock, in a fit of revenge, is determined to get his flesh. Despite the bond being legal, the court settles the matter against Shylock. The judge asks for the wedding rings of Bassanio and his friend and they reluctantly give them, even though they had sworn to always keep them on. What is the unusual connection between the courts and their wives? They go home to a steamed Portia and Nerissa, but how this end up? Will the men be forever lonely because of their mistake, or will all be forgiven because of the good reason to give the rings up? Find out, in The Merchant of Venice.

The Merchant of Venice is an amazing play. You can see it in Central Park at 8 pm Thursday, July 27th through Saturday, July 29th. Don’t miss this excellent production, and don’t forget to bring your Cultural Pass!

 

Turtle and Moose

Julius Caesar

Yesterday we saw Julius Caesar by Kentucky Shakespeare. It was a great play and this season’s tragedy. One of our favorite characters was Brutus, played by Dathan Hooper, because even though he killed Caesar he thought he was doing it for the sake of all Romans (However true you may or may not find that to be). He was fighting an inward battle against his country and his friendship of Caesar. He was definitely one of the most fleshed out characters Shakespeare has ever written about. Another one of our favorite characters was the soothsayer, played by Neill Robertson. We liked the absolute urgency in his voice and he completely nailed the walking on stage. He seemed like someone that we would have really believed in real life if he told us it was the end of the world.

One of our favorite scenes was when Caesar was killed. After Caesar was murdered, Brutus explained why it was justified. Mark Antony talked about what could happen now that Caesar is dead and not about how it was wrong because he could be killed for saying the latter. Another one of our favorite scenes was when Caesar’s wife was warned not to go to the senate meeting. It was heartwarming to see how much his wife cared about him but it also showed his glaring ignorance when he changed his mind because another person said so. A quick moral is, trust your instincts and trust your wife more than some thick, persuading senator. It was this scene that ended with Caesars death, all because he didn’t trust his wife. We also liked Mark Antony’s speech at Caesar’s funeral. He really manages to twist the knife over what Brutus has done even while reminding the audience what an “honorable man” Brutus is.

This play is a tragedy, meaning blood everywhere and no marriages! It starts with Romans, including Caesar, coming back from a successful war and a party being held in celebration. On Caesar’s way to the celebration he is stopped by a soothsayer that warns him to beware the ides of March, which basically means to be careful on March 15th. Caesar basically laughs off the warning. Meanwhile, Cassius convinces Brutus to conspire against Caesar for the good of Rome. Caesar also ignores the warnings of his wife and goes out on March 15th on the advice of a senator. Caesar is murdered shortly thereafter. The conspirators were forced out of the city, but what does that mean for the people of Rome, how will Brutus face the fact that he killed his friend in cold blood for even what Brutus believes to be good reasons. Find out in Julius Caesar. This was a very fun play to watch. The gruesomeness of the bloody deaths is well simulated so watch for it! You can see this play in rotating rep and can find all dates and info on KY Shakespeare’s site. This was an excellent play and we hope that you come and see it. Don’t forget that Shakespeare in the Park is part of the Louisville Cultural Pass as well.

Turtle and Moose

Kentucky Shakespeare’s Much Ado about Nothing

Hello, we are Turtle and Moose – back for the 2017 season of Kentucky Shakespeare. We saw the amazing comedy that is Much Ado about Nothing. The play opens with the Prince of Aragon having defeated his brother Don John and to celebrate the Prince and some of his men, Claudio and Benedick, went to masked ball held by the governor. Claudio, having seen the daughter of the governor, Hero, before going off to war and now returned, was now in love with Hero.  The Prince helped Claudio secure an engagement with Hero and they planned to be married the next week. Benedick’s friends tried to get him engaged with Beatrice, the governor’s niece and cousin of Hero, despite the constant snarky banter between Benedick and Beatrice. The plan was to get Benedick’s friends to talk of Beatrice loving Benedick and vice versa. Will Benedick and Beatrice fall for each other? Or while the plan crumble at its foundations. What will happen to Claudio and Hero – find out in Much Ado about Nothing!  One of our favorite characters was Benedick because he was a very sarcastic and cuttingly witty, but equally funny. Our other favorite character was Don John because he was an evil mastermind with a clever plan to stop love. One of our favorite scenes was when Benedick’s friends were talking and saying that Beatrice loved Benedick because it was hilarious to see Benedick try to hide in various places when they knew he was there the entire time. Our other favorite scene was the wedding because it was happy to see everyone be happy. Go see the show to see who gets married! We very highly recommend this show – it is truly wonderful.

Much Ado about Nothing runs every day except Monday now through Sunday, June 11th and then as part of the rotating repertoire July 12th through the 22nd. Kentucky Shakespeare is also part of the Louisville Cultural Pass which officially kicks off June 3rd through August 12th.

We’ve created a Google calendar of events for the Cultural Pass this summer so it’s easy to see what activities are available each day from June3rd to August 12th. Feel free to link to it and any corrections can be emailed to us at louisvilleartkids@gmail.com.

Kentucky Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar

We went to see Julius Caesar at Iroquois Park for Shakespeare in the Parks. There were only six actors and each of them did an amazing job in this tragedy.

The story starts with Julius Caesar coming back to Rome and everyone is rejoicing his return except for Cassius who wants him dead. After talking to Cassius, Brutus changes from liking Caesar to thinking he is evil. Brutus is a gifted speaker so he gets Caska and Lucius Cinna to help, making a total of four conspirators to fight against Caesar.  Caesar is warned by a prophet to “beware the ides of March”, which Caesar ignores. On the ides of March, Caesar’s wife has a dream of a fountain of Caesar pouring out blood so she tells Caesar not to go to the Senate. Cassius tells Caesar not to worry because his wife interpreted the dream wrong, so he goes anyway. At a podium, Caesar is about to accept the position of king but is stabbed by the four conspirators and dies. What will happen to the conspirators? Who will be the new leader of Rome? Find out in Julius Caesar.

One of our favorite characters was Brutus because he thought he was doing the right thing when he killed Julius Caesar but he was being manipulated by Cassius the whole time. We like that he liked Julius but his mind was changed so easily. Our other favorite character was Cassius because he was so good at manipulating people. We like how he was able to change people’s opinions so easily. One of our favorite scenes was the scene where Julius Caesar was killed because Julius was so happy because he was becoming king but he was killed by Brutus and the other conspirators and everyone changed their mind from thinking that Caesar was the right person to thinking he was a bad person and deserved to die because he was a tyrant.  Something this play can teach us is that people can change their opinions on something so quickly so you need to think about what you do and who you side with before doing something.

We are definitely looking forward to Shakespeare in the Park this summer. The season will be Much Ado about Nothing, Richard II, and Julius Caesar. The Globe Players will be doing the Merchant of Venice and there will be community partners’ shows as well.

 

Moose and Turtle