Julius Caesar

Yesterday we saw Julius Caesar by Kentucky Shakespeare. It was a great play and this season’s tragedy. One of our favorite characters was Brutus, played by Dathan Hooper, because even though he killed Caesar he thought he was doing it for the sake of all Romans (However true you may or may not find that to be). He was fighting an inward battle against his country and his friendship of Caesar. He was definitely one of the most fleshed out characters Shakespeare has ever written about. Another one of our favorite characters was the soothsayer, played by Neill Robertson. We liked the absolute urgency in his voice and he completely nailed the walking on stage. He seemed like someone that we would have really believed in real life if he told us it was the end of the world.

One of our favorite scenes was when Caesar was killed. After Caesar was murdered, Brutus explained why it was justified. Mark Antony talked about what could happen now that Caesar is dead and not about how it was wrong because he could be killed for saying the latter. Another one of our favorite scenes was when Caesar’s wife was warned not to go to the senate meeting. It was heartwarming to see how much his wife cared about him but it also showed his glaring ignorance when he changed his mind because another person said so. A quick moral is, trust your instincts and trust your wife more than some thick, persuading senator. It was this scene that ended with Caesars death, all because he didn’t trust his wife. We also liked Mark Antony’s speech at Caesar’s funeral. He really manages to twist the knife over what Brutus has done even while reminding the audience what an “honorable man” Brutus is.

This play is a tragedy, meaning blood everywhere and no marriages! It starts with Romans, including Caesar, coming back from a successful war and a party being held in celebration. On Caesar’s way to the celebration he is stopped by a soothsayer that warns him to beware the ides of March, which basically means to be careful on March 15th. Caesar basically laughs off the warning. Meanwhile, Cassius convinces Brutus to conspire against Caesar for the good of Rome. Caesar also ignores the warnings of his wife and goes out on March 15th on the advice of a senator. Caesar is murdered shortly thereafter. The conspirators were forced out of the city, but what does that mean for the people of Rome, how will Brutus face the fact that he killed his friend in cold blood for even what Brutus believes to be good reasons. Find out in Julius Caesar. This was a very fun play to watch. The gruesomeness of the bloody deaths is well simulated so watch for it! You can see this play in rotating rep and can find all dates and info on KY Shakespeare’s site. This was an excellent play and we hope that you come and see it. Don’t forget that Shakespeare in the Park is part of the Louisville Cultural Pass as well.

Turtle and Moose

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s